My Favorite Films of the Decade

I probably spend more time watching movies than most people, but even I can’t get to every film I want to see. While the streaming revolution has helped, there are still only so many hours in the day to sofa surf with a film. But that doesn’t stop me from trying!

The past 10 years of film have left some indelible marks on me. I try to rate every film I see on my IMDB account, so pulling together an end of decade list should be easy, right? Over the past few weeks though as I started going through my ratings I noticed a few things. First, there were no films this decade that I rated as a 10/10. That’s not a total surprise, as I reserve 10s for the films that rate among my all-time favorites. There were however a lot of 9s and 8s, which means there were a ton of films I loved in the 2010s. In fact, there were more than 25 that warranted and 8 or 9 by my system. So for this end of decade countdown I have listed a bunch of honorable mentions to go along with my Top 10, but not all of my 8s made the cut.

The following are films I really loved in the 2010s, not films I deem to be “best of” by some objective or even subjective measure. Also, I didn’t see every film I wanted to over the past 10 years, so there may be a few that get some measure of universal kudos that I just haven’t seen yet. Get Out is one example, as is Whiplash and Parasite. I have those and others on my “to-see” list so they may very well rank among my favorites of the decade but they are obviously not listed below.

Honorable mentions, in no particular order:

  • La La Land (2016). It may not have won Best Picture, but I la la loved it. Gotta give Damien Chazelle credit for reinventing a lost genre.
  • Dean (2016). Demetri Martin is understated and underrated as an actor and storyteller.
  • The Hateful Eight (2015). The second best Tarantino film of the decade. The tension is so thick you can cut it with a machete.
  • The Florida Project (2017). This film made a ton of “best of” lists in 2017. I really like films that show how life really is for some of the country’s forgotten and less fortunate — it reminds me of how lucky I am. And a great performance by Willem Dafoe.
  • Frances Ha (2012). If Noah Baumbach is the new Woody Allen (and I think he is) than Greta Gerwig is his Diane Keaton. The 2010s may well be remembered most for being the decade that Gerwig went from adorable indie actress to certifiable Hollywood royalty.
  • Gravity (2013). I went in thinking Gravity was overrated and I came out thinking Alfonso Cuarón is a fucking genius. That said, Roma is not on my favorites list!
  • Your Name. (2016). I never really gave anime a second thought, but my son dragged me to see this and it was awe inspiring and made me go back and add a bunch of anime films to my watch list. This one is stunningly beautiful. It is fine art.
  • Ex Machina (2014). Really enjoyable thriller about the slippery slope of artificial intelligence.
  • Kill Your Darlings (2013). Beat poets Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, and William Burroughs along with murder, sex, and intrigue. Here’s more proof Daniel Radcliffe is making very smart choices in his post Harry Potter roles. Mark my word he will win an Oscar someday soon.
  • Lady Bird (2017). Greta Gerwig’s directorial debut proves she’s much more than Noah Baumbach’s muse. Saoirse Ronan is the best actor of her generation and her films are not to be missed.
  • Moonlight (2016). I can’t remember the last time I walked out of a movie theater so moved.
  • Motherless Brooklyn (2019). It may have taken Edward Norton 20 years to make this film about a detective with Tourette’s Syndrome, but it was worth the wait. And yet again Willem Dafoe steals a film (it was a great decade for him).
  • BlacKkKlansman (2018). Wouldn’t be a list of favorites without a film by my favorite director Spike Lee. John David Washington and Adam Driver (who has slowly made his way up my list of favorite actors) are superb in this story of infiltrating the KKK.
  • The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011). I thought it was a mistake to remake the Swedish versions of this series, but then I saw Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara kill it in this David Fincher masterpiece.
  • 12 Years a Slave (2013). Right up there with Roots and Amistad in terms of best and most important films about American slavery. Maybe the best ensemble cast of the decade led by an incredible performance by Chiwetel Ejiofor.
  • Argo (2012). Say what you want about Ben Affleck, but the dude directed the hell out of this film which kept me on the edge of my seat until the final frame. Ar-go-fuck-yourself!
  • Spotlight (2015). I’m a sucker for a good journalism film and this one may be the best since All the President’s Men. I still think the Catholic church has gotten off too easily on all this abuse stuff.

In order, my favorite 10 films of the decade:

10. A Star Is Born (2018). I still get chills when I think back on that scene where Ally first walks out onto the stage to sing her duet with Jack. And the way they shot it, it felt like I was at a concert while sitting in the theater. The performances were great and the music was awesome. This film made me a Lady Gaga fan and I had definitely not been prior to seeing it. I don’t care about comparisons to previous versions of the film either. This version is larger than life.

9. Call Me By Your Name (2017). I didn’t see this coming of age film until a few weeks ago but it left a huge mark. I’m not sure I’ve ever seen an actor better portray that awkward time between being a teen and a young adult. Timothée Chalamet is already at the top of his game and he’s not yet 25 years old. And the scene near the end of the film where Michael Stuhlbarg tells his son he knows about his sexuality and he loves him — my heart literally exploded.

8. In A World…(2013). The world needs more smart, funny women so we should continue to encourage Lake Bell to keep making movies and TV shows. This little film was Bell’s directorial debut and she also wrote and starred in it. She is a triple threat and a treasure (I even like her silly little sitcom Bless This Mess on ABC). In A World… is exactly the kind of film I love — it sneaks up on you with its smart and clever comedy. And the performances by Bell, Demetri Martin, Tig Notaro, Rob Corddry, Eva Longoria, Nick Offerman, and Fred Melamed are wonderful. Kudos to whomever cast this funny little gem of a film.

7. The Shape of Water (2017). I loved this Oscar winner and really don’t understand the backlash it got from some who saw it only as a weird love story between a woman and a fish. Yeah, he was a monster, but the story was about Elisa and her sad little internally focused world and the creature was meant to be a symbol for everyone who feels a little different. Sally Hawkins was a revelation in this role, saying so much without words. The film is also a wonderful tribute to the monster films of the 50s and 60s, and throw in great supporting roles by Octavia Spencer, Richard Jenkins, and the brilliant and underappreciated Michael Shannon and this film blows it out of the water.

6. Green Book (2018). I never stopped raving about Green Book after seeing it for the first time and I was thrilled when it brought home the Best Picture Oscar. Viggo Mortensen is probably my second favorite actor after Leonardo and he killed the role of Tony Lip. Mahershala Ali deserved his second Oscar for playing Dr. Don Shirley, but Viggo was robbed. This was the rare buddy movie in which both characters came away as better men as they each learned something important about themselves.

5. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013). Martin Scorsese is getting a lot of kudos for The Irishman, and it’s good, but for my money it’s not even his best film of the decade let alone his career. The Wolf of Wall Street is an hilarious film filled with tremendous and award-winning performances, none better than Leonardo DiCaprio’s. His Jordan Belfort is a tour-de-force and one of the best acting performances of Leo’s majestic career (certainly better than the one for which he finally won an Oscar, The Revenant). This film featured great supporting performances from Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie as well, and it even provides a nice little lesson on what’s truly important in life.

4. Django Unchained (2012). You can argue all you want about Quentin Tarantino’s place among the Hollywood elite, but for my money he’s Top 10 all time among directors. He should get an Oscar just for introducing American film goers to Christoph Waltz! I rate Django Unchained second among the nine films Tarantino has brought us as a director so far (Pulp Fiction is my number one). The unusual story of Waltz’s German bounty hunter and Jamie Foxx’s freed slave as they cross the country working together to bring the worst of the nation to justice is classic Tarantino. And every small role is memorable, from Kerry Washington’s Broomhilda to Samuel L. Jackson’s aging house slave to Leo DiCaprio’s dark turn as slave owner Calvin Candie. Only Tarantino can bring us such difficult subject matter in such a prized package.

3. Baby Driver (2017). From the opening moments of this film, brilliant director Edgar Wright lets us know he’s going for something completely different with Baby Driver. Is he really going to choreograph the whole film to the music? Why yes, yes he is. Hollywood has never seen anything like it, which speaks to Wright’s unique place among today’s filmmakers. It’s part music video, and part action film, and it works beautifully. Like La La Land before it, this film literally revolutionizes the medium. Frankly, it makes the already great performances by Ansel Elgort, Jon Hamm, Jamie Foxx, and (sorry) Kevin Spacey even more remarkable given they had to take Wright’s direction and time every movement to the music. The result is a high speed, musical, and wildly entertaining film.

2. The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014). Look, either you love Wes Anderson films or you don’t. I happen to think he’s ridiculously talented and has given viewers some of the most memorable and interesting films of the past few decades. I think The Grand Budapest Hotel is his best film. It’s quirky and interesting and visually stunning. And it features an all-star cast of Oscar-winning Anderson regulars and a few first timers, including Ralph Fiennes, Adrien Brody, Willem Dafoe (there he is again), Jeff Goldblum, Harvey Keitel, Jude Law, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Saoirse Ronan, Tilda Swinton, and of course Owen Wilson and Jason Schwartzman. The Grand Budapest Hotel was nominated for Best Picture, ultimately losing out Birdman, but it was a particularly tough group of nominees that also included the next film on my list.

1. Boyhood (2014). As with many films on my favorites list, Boyhood is not a typical Hollywood film. It tells the story of Mason from his early childhood until his arrival at college and it was shot with the same actors over a 12 year period to add to the realism of the characters. It’s really a feat of film making arrogance. But there is no director better to deliver such realism than the master of dialogue and character driven features himself, Richard Linklater. I’ll be honest, my love of Boyhood perhaps has something to do with the fact that Mason’s and his parent’s lives track pretty darn close to my own life. In fact, I watched this nearly three hour masterpiece around the same time my son, Connor, was heading off to college himself. To say that this film jabbed me in my soft white underbelly is an understatement. By the end, as Mason is left on his own at college for the first time, I was left laying on the floor in a heap of Kleenex. I was so emotional afterward I couldn’t think of anything but Boyhood for days. Were the performances by young Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, and Linklater regular Ethan Hawke great? Yes, they were magnificent. But Boyhood struck me on a guttural level that I can’t say I’ve ever felt with a film in my life. It was less a film than an experience. We go to films for a variety of reasons. To escape. To dream. To learn. To be entertained. But every once in a while it’s great to go to a movie to simply feel.

One thought on “My Favorite Films of the Decade

  1. OMG: “La La”…the worst film of the decade. I couldn’t get past 30 minutes. Fortunately, it was at home so my throw-up was easy to clean up. I will go along with “Boyhood” though.

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